Science

SCIENCE

Intent:

At St John’s we want to develop children who have a conceptual understanding and respect
for life and natural Sciences. Therefore our curriculum enables children to experience
different types of enquiry to help them ask and answer scientific questions about the world
around them.
We believe that Science ignites curiosity in children and in turn equips children with the
ability to question the implication of Science today and for the future. The subject
encourages children to be inquisitive and respectful as they develop key skills
through collaborative working and problem-solving. We provide opportunities for children
to apply their mathematical knowledge to their understanding of Science, including
collecting, presenting and analysing data. Working scientifically is built-on throughout their
school career so that they can use equipment, conduct experiments and explain concepts
confidently. We believe that all of the children at St John’s have the potential to make the
world a better place and aim to provide a Science curriculum that fosters a healthy
inquisitiveness and promotes respect for our universe.

Implementation:

In the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS), children begin to develop their scientific knowledge by taking part in a range of scientific enquiries. These activities link primarily  to the following four areas of the learning: Communication and Language, Physical Development, Understanding the World and Expressive Arts and Design.

In Key Stage 1, the principal focus of science teaching is to enable pupils to experience and observe phenomena, looking more closely at the natural and humanly-constructed world around them. They are encouraged to be curious and ask questions about what they notice. They continue to develop their understanding of scientific ideas by using different types of scientific enquiry to answer their own questions, including observing changes over a period of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative tests, and finding things out using secondary sources of information. Children begin to use simple scientific language to talk about what they have found out and communicate their ideas to a range of audiences in a variety of ways.

Throughout their time in Key Stage 1, children cover a range of topics including:

  • Plants
  • Animals, including humans
  • Everyday materials
  • The Environment
  • Seasonal changes
  • Living things and their habitats
  • Scientists and Inventors

In Lower Key Stage 2, the principal focus of science teaching is to enable pupils to broaden their scientific view of the world around them. Children will do this through exploring, talking about, testing and developing ideas about everyday phenomena and the relationships between living things and familiar environments, and by beginning to develop their ideas about functions, relationships and interactions. Children will ask their own questions about what they observe and make some decisions about which types of scientific enquiry are likely to be the best ways of answering them, including observing changes over time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative and fair tests and finding things out using secondary sources of information. Children will draw simple conclusions and use some scientific language, first, to talk about and, later, to write about what they have found out.  Each topic will begin by looking at an influential scientist that has made major discoveries or theories within that specific topic area.

Throughout their time in Lower Key Stage 2, children cover a range of topics including:

  • Plants
  • Animals, including humans
  • Rocks
  • Light
  • Forces and magnets
  • Living things and their habitats
  • States of matter
  • Sound
  • Electricity

 

In Upper Key Stage 2, the principal focus of science teaching is to enable pupils to develop a deeper understanding of a wide range of scientific ideas. Children will do this through exploring and talking about their ideas; asking their own questions about scientific phenomena; and analysing functions, relationships and interactions more systematically. At upper key stage 2, children will encounter more abstract ideas and begin to recognise how these ideas help them to understand and predict how the world operates. Children will also begin to recognise that scientific ideas change and develop over time. Children will select the most appropriate ways to answer science questions using different types of scientific enquiry, including observing changes over different periods of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out comparative and fair tests and finding things out using a wide range of secondary sources of information. Children will draw conclusions based on their data and observations, use evidence to justify their ideas, and use their scientific knowledge and understanding to explain their findings. Each topic will begin by looking at an influential scientist that has made discoveries or theories within that specific topic area.

Throughout their time in Upper Key Stage 2, children cover a range of topics including:

  • Living things and their habitats
  • Animals, including humans
  • Properties and changes of materials
  • Earth and space
  • Forces
  • Evolution and inheritance
  • Light
  • Electricity

 

Impact:

Children at St John’s will develop their scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. During their time at St John’s, children will develop their understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them. By the time children leave St John’s they will be equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future.

Healthy Living Day 1